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Dr. Eldon Tyrell was the founder and corporate head of the Tyrell Corporation. He and his company were responsible for the design, manufacturing, and selling of humanoid slaves called replicants.

BiographyEdit

Tyrell had a niece, Lilith, whose memories were used for the experimental Nexus-7, Rachael. Tyrell used Rachael as his assistant and never told her she was a replicant, leading her to believe she was human.[2]

Tyrell was a master chess player, having lost to J.F. Sebastian only twice and the second time, he lost because Batty told Sebastian what moves to make. He also owned an artificial owl.[2]

2019Edit

In November 2019, Tyrell met with Blade Runner Rick Deckard, who arrived at the Tyrell Corporation after being ordered by Captain Harry Bryant to perform a Voight-Kampff empathy test on a Nexus-6. This was to allow Deckard to better grasp the situation with a group of escaped replicants led by Roy Batty and how they worked. Tyrell wished to see a negative test result of the empathy test before he allowed Deckard to test a replicant. Tyrell suggested that Rachael be used, only for Deckard to discover that Rachael's nature as an experimental replicant with memory implants. making her harder to detect as not human.[2]

He met with rookie Blade Runner Ray McCoy shortly after meeting with Deckard and spoke briefly with him about the death of one of his senior Gravity Lab technicians, but he provided little useful information.[3]

Tyrell was confronted by a Nexus-6 named Clovis who demanded Nexus-6 DNA data in the hope of using it to find a way to prolong his lifespan without Tyrell's involvement. When Tyrell insisted the 4-year lifespan was unalterable, Clovis moved to shoot him, but was thwarted by Tyrell's security team.[3]

Later, Tyrell met with Governor Maurice Kolvig to convince him to allow replicants to work on Earth as slave labor, cleaning up the kipple that surrounded Los Angeles. However, the governor was killed by Clovis as the two discussed plans for implementation.[3]

At some point, Tyrell developed a pathogen deadly to replicants, codenamed Night Owl. It was designed as a failsafe for if replicants had become too dangerous.[1]

Later, leader of the escaped replicants, Roy Batty, used Tyrell and Sebastian's chess game to enter Tyrell's living quarters to demand more life. Tyrell remained calm when confronted by Roy and explained that altering DNA was fatal in all circumstances. He attempted to comfort Roy referring to him as the "prodigal son" and reminding him, "The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long." This did little to comfort Batty, who kissed Tyrell and then proceeded to crush his skull, killing him as the horrified Sebastian looked on. His body, along with Sebastian's, was found by the police shortly after.[2]

Behind the scenes Edit

Tyrell is based upon the character Eldon Rosen from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

It was originally intended that the Tyrell murdered by Batty would be revealed to be a replicant, and as a result, Batty would head up to the next floor, where he would discover the real Tyrell in cryogenic suspension. Sebastian would then explain that an incurable disease struck Tyrell, who had himself frozen until a cure is found. Subsequently Batty would demand that Sebastian awaken him. Two different versions exist with regard to what would have happened next.

In the first, Sebastian would break down and admit that he made an error years earlier and resulted in Tyrell's death and in a rage, Batty kills him. In the second Sebastian reveals that years before (estimated as 2013) a blackout struck the city and during the approximately forty-five minutes the power was out, Tyrell's life support failed and he died. Again Batty is struck by despair and feeling there is no hope, he kills Sebastian much as he did in the finished film.

Although screenwriter Hampton Fancher wanted Sterling Hayden for the part, director Ridley Scott cast Hayden's The Killing co-star Joe Turkel in the role based on his performance in The Shining. While filming, Turkel had difficulties learning his lines and had to be assisted with cue cards. Turkel stated that his struggles were caused by stresses in his personal life at the time.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Blade Runner: Revelations
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Blade Runner – all versions
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Blade Runner (1997 game)
  4. Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner – Revised & Updated Edition
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